MTG “Pyramid of the Pantheon” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of Amonkhet’s new artifact cards: Pyramid of the Pantheon.

The Card Name:

Pyramid of the Pantheon

  • Pantheon (noun) =  A group made up of all of the gods from one religion.

e.g. “Zeus, Athena and Aphrodite were all members of the Greek pantheon.”

Image result for pyramid art mtg

The Flavour Text:

“Five gods, one purpose”

 

 

  • Purpose (noun) = the reason a thing exists or was made.

e.g “The purpose of a knife is to cut things.”

Synomyns: Function, Role, Motivation.

 

What do you think?:

1. Is this a good card?

2. Do you use Lego bricks to mark your brick counter when you play?

3. Have you used “Pyramid of the Pantheon” in any of your draft decks? How was it?

4. Would you play this card in EDH? With what Commander?

 

 

English Den:

Experienced, qualified and professional English teacher working in Warsaw, Poland.

Interested in pop culture, and using pop culture to teach languages.

Available for private or in-business classes.

International classes also available on Skype.

Contact Cian.shep@gmail.com for further information.

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MTG “Forsake the Wordly” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of Amonkhet’s high-performing common cards: Forsake the Worldly.

The Card Name:

Forsake the Worldly

 

  • to forsake (verb) = Old English way to say “abandon” or “give up” – to completely stop doing or being interested in something (often used in a religious or mythological context).

e.g. “Forsake your quest!!” the old wizard cried.

Synonyms: to quit, to abandon, to renounce.

 

  • worldly (adjective) = the opposite of spiritual: connected with real, everyday life.

e.g. “The monk simply had no time for wordly things.”

Synonyms: earthly, terrestrial, material.

Image result for forsake the worldly art

 

The Flavour Text:

“Why cling to these trappings? They are but tools and affectations. True wealth can be possessed only in the afterlife.”

 

  • to cling to something (verb) = to hold something very tightly.

e.g “On a crowded train, Mary clings to her bag with both hands.”

Synomyns: to to clutch, to grip, to clasp.

 

  • Trappings (noun) = outward appearances, usually clothes or ornaments, that may not show/ reflect your true character.

e.g “His new office had all the trappings of success, but in reality they were almost bankrupt.”

Synomyns: Appearances, Finery, Effects.

 

  • Affectation (noun) = some fake behaviour or way of acting, done to make yourself look good and impress other people.

e.g “He smoked cigars as an affectation – he thought it made him look cool.”

Synomyns: Pose, Facade, Pretension.

 

  • Wealth (noun) = having a lot of money, or valuable things.

e.g “Tim’s wealth allowed him to travel all over the world.”

Synomyns: Riches, Means, Affluence.

 

  • to possess (verb) = to have or own something.

e.g “John knew Mary possessed a large amount of money, and that was why he was interested in her…”

Synomyns: to hold, to own, to have.

What do you think?:

1. Is this a good card?

2.  How do you feel about the Cycling mechanic?

3. Have you used “Forsake the Worldly” in any of your draft decks? How was it?

4.  Would you play this card in EDH? With what Commander?

 

 

English Den:

Experienced, qualified and professional English teacher working in Warsaw, Poland.

Interested in pop culture, and using pop culture to teach languages.

Available for private or in-business classes.

International classes also available on Skype.

Contact Cian.shep@gmail.com for further information.

 

MTG “Vizier of Tumbling Sands” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of Amonkhet’s uncommon cards: Vizier of Tumbling Sands.

The Card Name:

Vizier of Tumbling Sands

  • Vizier (noun) = A powerful serveant or public worker, usually in a Muslim country or culture.

e.g. “Jafar from Aladin was a vizier.”

 

Image result for jafar

 

  • to tumble (verb) = to fall suddenly, or to flip over in the air while falling.

e.g. “I slipped on a banana skin and tumbled down the stairs.”

Synonyms: to topple, to fall over, to trip.

 

Image result for pull from tomorrow

 

The Flavour Text:

“Time is like the Luxa River—though it flows in one direction, it can be diverted.”

 

  • to flow (verb) = to move like water.

e.g “The river flows to the sea.”

Synomyns: to run, to course, to stream.

 

  • diverted (adjective) = made to move or turn in a different direction.

e.g “My usual road to work was closed, so I was diverted onto another street.”

Synomyns: rerouted, redirected, deflected.

 

What do you think?:

1. Is this a good card?

2. What are your favourite “time” related cards in Magic? (Mine is Time Machine…)

3. Have you used “Vizier of Tumbling Sands” in any of your draft decks? How was it?

 

MTG “Sandwurm Convergence” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of Amonkhet’s rare cards: Sandwurm Convergence.

The Card Name:

Sandwurm Convergence

  • a convergence – a place where things (in this case, Sandwurms) meet, join, or connect.

e.g. “There was a convergence of storm clouds over Paris yesterday. ”

Synonyms: intersection, confluence, meeting point.

 

Image result for Sandwurm Convergence art

 

The Flavour Text:

Cantankerous and territorial, sandwurms claim even the skies above their dunes.

 

  • cantankerous (adjective) = often angry and difficult to deal with.

e.g “I don’t visit John’s house often – his father is a bit cantankerous.”

Synomyns: grouchy, grumpy, cranky, crabby.

 

  • territorial (adjective) = aggressively defending a place (or sometimes a thing) you own.

e.g. “My dog is a bit territorial about our garden, so be careful when you come in the gate. ”

Synonyms: defensive, protective, jealous.

 

  • to claim(verb) = to try to take something for yourself.

e.g. “Paul claimed the last pizza slice, and nobody stopped him.”

Synonyms: to take, to demand, to requisition.

 

What do you think?:

1. Is this a good card?

2. Does this card make you think of Dune?

3. What are your favourite Sandwurms from movies/books/tv series? (I always liked the ones from Tremors, or maybe Onix from Pokemon?)

3. Would you play “Sandwurm Convergence” in EDH? With what Commander?

 

MTG “Harvest Season” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of Amonkhet’s rare cards: Harvest Season.

The Card Name:

Harvest Season

  • to harvest (verb) – to gather/collect something, usually crops (plants grown to be food).

e.g. “We harvested the wheat last year, to save it for the winter. ”

Synonyms: to reap, to pick, to collect.

 

  • Harvest Season (noun) – the time of the year when the crops are fully grown, and ready to be gathered. Usually in the months of October and November.

(The card name is probably also a reference to the  Season of the Harvest, the third and final season of the Ancient Egyptian calendar: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Season_of_the_Harvest)

 

Eagle-eyed readers may also notice that these mentions of crops being harvested, or reaped, in a certain correct season or time determined by the position of the sun, connects back in some interesting ways to the main storyline of the Amonkhet block…

Image result for harvest season mtg

The Flavour Text:

A true reflection of nature: death fostering life.

 

  • a reflection (noun) = a repeated image or copy, seen in another place or context.

e.g “His organised desk was a reflection of his orderly personality”

Synomyns: mirror image, likeness.

 

  • to foster (verb) = to help something else to develop or grow.

e.g. “A teacher’s job is to foster children’s learning.”

Synonyms: to encourage, to cultivate, to nurture.

 

 

What do you think?:

1. Is this a good card?

2. How do you think it connects to the overall Amonkhet story?

3. Would you play “Harvest Season” in EDH? With what Commander?

 

MTG “Prowling Serpopard” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of the strangest creatures I’ve seen in a while: Prowling Serpopard.

The Card Name:

Prowling Serpopard

  • to prowl (verb) – to hunt in a stealthy, sneaky way.

e.g. “There was someone prowling around my house last night, so I called the police”

Synonyms:  to skulk, to sneak, to stalk.

 

  • Serpopard (noun) = a mix between a serpent (snake) and a leopard.

e.g “Wow, I have no idea what a Serpopard is….”

Synonyms: …..Cat-Snake???

The Flavour Text:

The viziers serving Rhonas, the god of strength, maintain the menagerie of animals employed during his trial.

 

  • Vizier (noun) = A powerful serveant or public worker, usually in a Muslim country or culture.

e.g. “Jafar from Aladin was a vizier.”

Image result for jafar

  • to maintain (verb) = to work so that something will continue working in a good condition.

e.g. “Jim maintains the servers so they don’t break down.”

Synonyms: to preserve, to take care of, to sustain.

 

  • Menagerie (noun) = a collection of captured wild animals.

e.g “Mark Zuckerberg probably has a menagerie of African animals in his garden.”

Synonyms: wildlife collection, zoo.

 

What do you think?:

1. Can you think of some combos with this card?

2. Did a snake and a leopard have a baby together? How did that work….?

3. Would you play Prowling Serpopard in EDH? With what Commander?

MTG “Cascading Cataracts” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of Amonkhet’s big name rare cards: Cascading Cataracts.

Cascading Cataracts

The Card Name:

Cascading Cataracts

  • to cascade (verb) – to move downwards like water, very quickly and powerfully (like a waterfall).

e.g. “I spilled my bottle, and water cascaded down the stairs.”

Synonyms: pour,gush, surge.

 

  • Cataracts – a series of large and powerful waterfalls, the most famous being the ones on the river Nile in Egypt.

(https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cataracts_of_the_Nile)

Image result for cascading cataracts art

The Flavour Text:

“The power that flows here cannot be denied. But where is the source?” – Nissa Revane

 

  • to flow (verb) = to move like water.

e.g “The river flows to the sea.”

Synomyns: to run, to course, to stream.

 

  • to deny (verb) = to say that something doesn’t exist or isn’t true.

e.g. “Mary said Paul was sleeping with Susie, but he denied it.”

Synonyms: to counter, to contradict, to repudiate.

 

  • source (noun) = where something begins or starts.

e.g “A broken wire was the source of the problem.”

Synonyms: origin, genesis, starting point.

 

What do you think?:

1. Is this a good card?

2. What uses can you think of for an indestructible land?

3. Would you play Cascading Cataracts in EDH? With what Commander?

 

 

MTG “Anointed Procession” Explained

Magic the Gathering is an international game, with players all over the world. Most of the game’s product is in English – why not take advantage of that to help in your language learning? There’s plenty of interesting vocabulary on a Magic card!

For example, here’s some of the words and phrases an English-learner can get from one of Amonkhet’s big name rare cards: Anointed Procession.

Image result for Anointed procession
The Card Name:

  • Anointed (adjective) – blesssed with holy oil.

e.g “Elizabeth was anointed when she became queen.”

 

  • Procession (noun) –

1. a crowd of people, moving together in an orderly way, often connected with religion.

e.g “There was a procession through the town after the funeral.”

 

2. an endlesss series of people/ things.

e.g. “She had a procession of emails to answer this morning.”

 

So, Anointed Procession’s card name means something like “an endless crowd of people, blessed with holy oil, that are moving in an orderly way”.

That sounds right!

Image result for Anointed procession

The Flavour Text:

“The gods may walk among the people, but they are not with them.” – Gideon Jura

 

  • to walk among the people – (idiom) – An old-fashioned way of saying that someone joined a crowd or moved into a crowd (often religious or mythological).

e.g. “Jesus walked among the people of Jerusalem.”

 

  • to be with the people – (idiom) – to support normal or working class people, usually in connection with politics.

e.g. “John was a popular politician, because he always seemed to be with the people.”

 

What do you think?:

1. Would you play this card in EDH? With what Commander?

2. Can you think of any combos with “Annointed Procession”?

3. Is this a good card?